Recycled kidney, anyone?


I am all for recycling.  I am even a fan of organ transplants.  I have signed my driver’s license, stating that I would be willing to donate my organs.   However, there is an ick factor in recycling a donated organ that has been rejected by its original transplanted host.

“Recently in Chicago, in what is believed to be the first documented case of its kind in the US, a transplanted kidney that was failing was removed from a patient while he was still alive and given to someone else.  Typically when  transplanted organs fail in living patients, doctors throw them away.

“The donated kidney lasted two weeks in the first patient, a 27-year old Illinois man.  The same disease that ruined his kidneys started to damage the new kidney, given to him by his sister.   With permission from the man and his sister, they removed it last July and re-transplanted it into a 67 year old Indiana man.

“Reusing a transplanted organ can be tricky—and riskier—because surgeons have to deal with the scar tissue that typically forms around an organ as the body heals.  Also, Wayne Shelton, a bioethicist at Albany Medical College in New York, said the practice may raise ethical questions.  Doctors need to make sure patients who are offered reused parts understand all the risks.”

I suppose a rejected kidney is better than no kidney, but I wonder at the wisdom of transplanting an organ that has been damaged by disease into a new host.  As holistic practitioners say, the issues are in the tissues.  This transplanted organ not only has had at least two previous hosts, but the third, or subsequent host will now have to deal with not only an organ containing DNA different from the rest of the body, but also one that has been damaged by disease.

What do you think?  Is this a risk that you would be comfortable with?

Until next time,

Polly

Houston Chronicle, April, 26, 2012

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About Polly Heil-Mealey, ND, P.Sc., HHP, M.Ed., C.C.I.

Dr. Polly Heil-Mealey is the Past-President of the International Iridology Practitioners Association (IIPA), as well as an IIPA Certified Iridologist with a Master’s Degree in Education, and a Naturopathic degree. She has been involved in education and Biblical health care since 1994. Dr. Polly has been active in both television and radio, presenting community service programs covering various topics. An international traveler, she gives seminars on alternative health practices, incorporating iridology and Biblical nutritional counseling. Dr. Polly now uses her expert ability to communicate vital and useful information to help her clients build or restore their health. One of Dr. Polly’s greatest passions is to see her clients restore their health through natural therapies. Every success story confirms the need for education in holistic practices. Dr. Polly brings a high level of dedication and commitment to her clientele. She has touched the lives of many with her concern and selfless devotion. The verse “My people perish for lack of knowledge,” is a scripture that touches every level of society. As clients learn and understand holistic protocols, they are able to improve their health drastically by incorporating diet and lifestyle changes. Dr. Polly is married to Stephen Hale, and together they have eight children. Both are very active in their church and serve on various boards in their community. Dr. Polly is also the director of Women’s Ministries of her church. Dr. Polly and Stephen reside in Humble, Texas.
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3 Responses to Recycled kidney, anyone?

  1. Chris says:

    Is the ‘risk’ from the used kidney greater than or less than the risk of death from not having any kidney at all? Personally, the ‘ick’ factor isn’t really a factor.

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